The Underdogs of Comedy

After happening into The Underdog and The Empress for their comedy nights, we were amazed at the indie comedy talent in this city. So, along with laughing uproariously at the many great comedians we saw, we got to plotting about somehow capturing even a glimpse of this great scene.

We decided a web series would the quickest way to get some of these funny people in front of an audience who hasn’t yet been out to one of the bars and venues hosting both regular and pop-up shows. Today we’re releasing six episodes featuring live sets from some of the comedians. More on what we learned making the series after the jump.  Continue reading

The First 20 Hours: How to Learn Anything Fast

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In the latest episode of WTF, Marc Maron talks to one of my very, very favourite standup comics, John Mulaney. Mulaney, who spent years as a staff writer on shows like Important Things with Demetri Martin and, most famously, SNL (he was one of the guys who created Stefon), talks about his early standup career, particularly touring as an emcee for acclaimed comic and filmmaker Mike Birbiglia.

“I went on the road with him for 30 days straight. and that was like a huge turning point. The lesson for me was that before that tour with Mike, I always wanted the show to be cancelled. I always wanted to have done a show. I wanted it behind me. And after doing 30 days straight where I had to emcee every night, I started to want to do the show itself.”

This is a powerful idea. It evokes the 10,000 hour rule popularized by Malcolm Gladwell in his book Outliers (which is now, admittedly, largely debunked): at a certain threshold, you develop your skills enough to become an expert. The Beatles are the most often cited case of the 10,000 hour rule in effect. John Lennon describes a period in their early years where they honed their craft playing German clubs.

“We had to play for hours and hours on end. Every song lasted twenty minutes and had twenty solos in it. That’s what improved the playing.”

Somewhere between 10,000 hours in a German club and 30 days on the road with Mike Birbiglia, though, lies Josh Kaufman’s book, The First 20 Hours.  Continue reading

Obstacles

Obstacles - house shootAfter producing a couple of our own things, we wanted to try our hand at producing someone else’s project. Lucky for us, we met a lovely lady by the name of Geeta Sehgal at Yegfilm and it just so happened she was writing a short about an anxious woman who had to confront one of her fears by crossing a bridge high above an Edmonton ravine to support her friend’s exhibit opening.

Geeta’s script arrived soon after we mentioned our interest in producing and we were off and running. Of course, this meant trying to standardize the process and forms we had begun crafting and putting to use on our pilot episode of Startups. Our challenge was to make sure the things we were doing as a duo would make sense to someone else working on the project and help us all accomplish the goal of bringing Geeta’s idea to screens.

More about what we learned, and the movie itself, after the jump.

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Sick Day

When we decided to make the jump into scripted comedy last year, we hit that roadblock a lot of other people hit: we got scared. We didn’t know what to do, how to do it, or if any of it would even work. So, in our own small way of encouraging you to push through your own roadblocks we present our first short – “Sick Day” – which is not all that great, but helped us kickstart a new path and hopefully shows you that the first time out just has to get you started. If you’re hesitating because you don’t think you’ll be good enough or you don’t know what to do, let this movie’s shortcomings be an example of how the first thing you make might not be great but you can get better really quickly, and we’ve all got your back.

So get out there and make the things you’re scared of making!

More about learning from mistakes and making a first thing after the jump. Continue reading